I am making this available to you, it would be best if we worked together at least the first few times to make sure you are doing all movements correctly to avoid further pain or injury, however if you feel you are able to do these on your own ~ please do! Feel better!

Corrective Exercise for Back Pain

 

Key Points

  • Back pain affects nearly 80% of Americans at some point in their lifetime, with episodes occurring in 50% of those individuals on a yearly basis.
  • The most common compensation that could indicate potential back pain are, an excessive forward lean, an excessive arch in the low back and arms falling forward.
  • Increasing the flexibility of the hip flexor complex and latissimus dorsi, while simultaneously increasing the strength of the gluteus maximus and deep core stabilizers of the spine is a great approach to preventing low back pain.

 

Back pain affects nearly 80% of Americans at some point in their lifetime, with episodes occurring in 50% of those individuals on a yearly basis. With such an incredibly high number of back pain episodes per year, it is imperative that the fitness professional have a strategy to evaluate and train their clients while preventing and or dealing with low back pain. It has been estimated that over $85 billion is spent annually on the treatment and care of low back pain ( www.webmd.com/back-pain/news ). Hopefully in the future by adopting a proactive and evidence-based approach, fitness professionals will help decrease both the number of episodes of back pain as well as the money spent to treat back pain by significant amounts.

On a daily basis fitness professionals will interact with individuals ranging from the most beginning level of fitness all the way to the most advanced. That being said the episodes of low back pain can and will still affect either group similarly. Back pain is not just an injury the severely unhealthy will deal with.

When designing an exercise program it is imperative that the program be designed for the specific needs of the individual that will be completing that program. To accomplish this it is important that the fitness professional perform a comprehensive evaluation of their client in order to determine their specific needs. 

So, how do we prevent low back pain?

Increasing the flexibility of the hip flexor complex and latissimus dorsi, while simultaneously increasing the strength of the gluteus maximus and deep core stabilizers of the spine is a great place to start.

The following programs can be used to prevent low back pain and or treat clients with low back pain that may enter a program under your guidance.

The first phase of any work out regimen should be to correct any movement imbalances while increasing the inter-segmental stability of the spine.

This is accomplished through the following 4 step process:

  1. INHIBIT (Foam Rolling)
  2. LENGTHEN (Static Stretching)
  3. ACTIVATE (Strengthening Exercises)
  4. INTEGRATE (Integration Exercises)

 

INHIBIT (Foam Rolling)

Exercise Exercise Description

Foam Roll: IT Band
 

Lie on your side with the foam roll placed under your hip.  Cross your top leg over the leg on the foam roll and place your foot on the floor.  The leg on the foam roll should be raised off the floor and remain that way during the exercise.  Slowly roll from the hip to the knee, rolling along the outer thigh, slightly in front of the hip and knee, applying prolonged pressure on tender spots for roughly 30 seconds.

Foam Roll: Thoracic Spine
 

Lie on the floor with the foam roll placed behind your upper back.  Place your arms across your chest.  Raise your hips off the floor and slowly roll back and forth , applying prolonged pressure on tender spots for roughly 30 seconds.

Foam Roll: Latissimus Dorsi 
 

Lie on one side with your arm extended overhead, thumb pointing up toward the ceiling.  Place a foam roll under your armpit.  Slowly move back and forth, and rotate slightly forward and backward, applying prolonged pressure on tender spots for roughly 30 seconds.

 

 

LENGTHEN (Static Stretch)

Exercise Exercise Description

Kneeling Hip Flexor Stretch 
 

Kneel on your back leg, bending your front leg 90-degrees.  Contract your glutes and shift your body forward.  Raise the arm that is on the same side as the knee that is on the ground, stretching to the opposite side until a stretch is felt in the front of your pelvis.  Rotate backwards and hold for 30-seconds.

Kneeling Lat Stretch
 

Knee in front of a chair with one arm placed on top of the chair, with your thumb pointed up toward the ceiling.  Keep the other hand on the ground.  Lower your hips toward your heels until a stretch is felt alongside the torso and into the lower back.  Hold for 30 seconds.

* When performing static stretching be sure to hold each stretch for a minimum of 20 seconds. Perform 2-3 stretched per side.

 

ACTIVATE (Strengthening Exercises)

Exercise Exercise Description

Ball Bridge 
 

Begin by lying face up on a ball.  Place the ball directly between your shoulder blades, allowing your head to rest on the ball and place your hands on your hips.  Place your feet flat on the floor, shoulder-width apart.  Draw-in your navel and contract your glutes.  Lift your pelvis until your knees and in line with your hips and shoulders.  Hold this position for a few seconds and then lower your pelvis down slowly.

Side: Iso Ab
 

Lie on your side with your feet and legs placed on top of each other.  Place your forearm on the ground with your elbow located directly under your shoulder.  Draw-in your navel and contract your glutes.  Lift your hips and legs off the ground until your body forms a straight line from head to toe, keeping your weight placed on your forearm and feet.  Hold the top position for a few seconds then slowly lower your body to the ground.

Start with a 5 second hold, repeat 10 times

 

INTEGRATE (Integration Exercises)

Exercise Exercise Description

Ball Squat to Curl to Overhead Press 
 

Hold two dumbbells in your hands, let them hang down at your sides and keep your palms facing in toward your body.  Keep your feet pointed straight ahead and placed shoulder-width apart.  Contract your glutes and perform a three-quarter squat.  Stand, pushing through your heels, and curl the dumbbells to your chest.  Next, press the dumbbells overhead, fully extending both your arms keeping your palms turned away from your body.

Perform 2 sets of 12 reps.

If you follow this integrated process of evaluation to implementation of the 4 step Corrective Exercise Training method, you will be able to dramatically increase the function of your clients who have back pain, while preventing your clients who have the movement compensations associated with low back pain from experiencing set backs in their program.





© TTWS